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Launch Graph Manager

Blog Post Contributions


We love community contributions to the Apollo Blog! If you're as excited about the data graph as we are and would like to teach the community, share your unique Apollo experience, or show off something cool you've built with Apollo, we're here for you.

Contributing to the blog

If you'd like to contribute to the Apollo Blog, we ask that you first submit your blog post idea using our Blog Post Proposal form. Read on for more information on how to get your blog post on the Apollo Blog.

Blog post proposal process

  1. Submit the Blog Post Proposal form.
  2. An Apollo team member will get back to you within a week and let you know if the post was accepted after reviewing your proposal.

Accepted posts

If we've accepted your post, we'll work with you to turn your idea into a draft and then into an excellent blog post that the community can benefit from!

Posts not accepted

If we didn't accept your post, no worries! We'll provide you with feedback or other ways that we can turn your post into something that will be useful to the community. Either way, we'll help you!

Content guidelines

Here are some tips for writing awesome content that helps the community.

Content we love

Types of blog posts we love to read:

  • “How to” guides, recipes, or tutorials on how to address problems you’ve solved with Apollo (here's an example, "Apollo Client [React] — How to Query on Click")
  • Stories about how Apollo helped you overcome different challenges on work and personal projects
  • Something cool you built with Apollo
  • Showcasing a tool, fix, or other content you or someone else has contributed to Apollo’s open source community
  • Guidance and resources for learning Apollo, GraphQL, best practices, architecture, different tools/integrations, and other Apollo-related content.
  • Any other topics that you think would be valuable to people learning about or working with Apollo

We're open to all kinds of topics as long as it relates to Apollo in some way. We love posts of all reading levels (beginner to intermediate, to advanced). If you're stumped, we especially like posts that mix Apollo with the following topics:

  • TypeScript
  • GraphQL best practices
  • Caching
  • React.js
  • Authentication & authorization
  • Error handling
  • Front-end development
  • Server-side development
  • Scaling GraphQL
  • Schema design

Content to avoid

  • Docs content. Some content is better found in the Apollo docs guides and tutorials, as it can be found in a section for related content and not buried under pages of other paginated blog posts.
  • Promotional content. Please don’t submit content to the Apollo blog solely to promote a product, yourself, or link-building.

    • Here’s what you can do instead: If you have a product or project you want to share on the Apollo blog, focus on practical information, and make sure there’s a clear relationship with Apollo or Apollo-adjacent topics. You could write a step by step guide to using your product with Apollo. You could write a case study highlighting the direct impact Apollo had on your awesome project and offer helpful tips for others to recreate your success.
  • Content that doesn’t seem to have a clear benefit for Apollo users and/or the Apollo community. For example, if you’re writing about a use-case or integration that’s extremely niche or unique to specific conditions that are uncommon outside of your organization, the Apollo blog might not be the best place for your content. Likewise, if your blog post doesn’t seem to have any direct relationship with Apollo (or an interesting indirect relationship with Apollo), then it may be more appropriate for a personal blog or another community blog.

These are all guidelines. If you believe something is valuable to the Apollo community, please do submit it to us- we'd love to hear from you!

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