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Metrics and logging

How to monitor Apollo Server's performance


Apollo Server integrates seamlessly with Apollo Graph Manager to help you monitor the execution of your GraphQL operations. It also provides configurable mechanisms for logging each phase of a GraphQL operation.

Using Federation? Check out the documentation for federated tracing.

Sending metrics to Apollo Graph Manager

Apollo Graph Manager provides an integrated hub for all of your GraphQL performance data. It aggregates and displays information for your schema, queries, requests, and errors. You can also configure alerts that support Slack and Datadog integrations.

Connecting to Graph Manager

To connect Apollo Server to Graph Manager, first visit the Graph Manager UI to get a Graph Manager API key. You can provide this API key to Apollo Server in one of the following ways:

  • Include the API key in the constructor options for ApolloServer.
  • Assign the API key to the ENGINE_API_KEY environment variable.

Providing an API key via the ApolloServer constructor

You can provide your Graph Manager API key as an option to the ApolloServer constructor like so:

const { ApolloServer } = require("apollo-server");

const server = new ApolloServer({
  typeDefs,
  resolvers,
  engine: {    // The Graph Manager API key    apiKey: "YOUR_API_KEY_HERE",    // A tag for this specific environment (e.g. `development` or `production`).    // For more information on schema tags/variants, see    // https://www.apollographql.com/docs/platform/schema-registry/#associating-metrics-with-a-variant    schemaTag: 'development',  }});

server.listen().then(({ url }) => {
  console.log(`🚀  Server ready at ${url}`);
});

Providing an API key via environment variables

You can provide your Graph Manager API key to Apollo Server via the ENGINE_API_KEY environment variable. Similarly, you can assign a particular variant to an Apollo Server instance via the ENGINE_SCHEMA_TAG environment variable.

You can set environment variable values on the command line as seen below, or with the dotenv npm package (or similar).

# Replace the example values below with values specific to your use case.
ENGINE_API_KEY=YOUR_API_KEY ENGINE_SCHEMA_TAG=development node start-server.js

Identifying distinct clients

Graph Manager's client awareness feature enables you to view metrics for distinct versions of your clients. To enable this, your clients need to include some or all of the following identifying information in the headers of GraphQL requests they send to Apollo Server:

IdentifierHeader Name (default)Example Value
Client nameapollographql-client-nameiOS Native
Client versionapollographql-client-version1.0.1

Each of these fields can have any string value that's useful for your application. To simplify the browsing and sorting of your client data in Graph Manager, a three-part version number (such as 1.0.1) is recommended for client versions.

Client version is not tied to your current version of Apollo Client (or any other client library). You define this value and are responsible for updating it whenever meaningful changes are made to your client.

Setting client awareness headers in Apollo Client

If you're using Apollo Client, you can set default values for client name and version in the ApolloClient constructor. All requests to Apollo Server will automatically include these values in the appropriate headers.

Using custom headers

For more advanced cases, or to use headers other than the default headers, pass a generateClientInfo function into the ApolloServer constructor:

const { ApolloServer } = require("apollo-server");

const server = new ApolloServer({
  typeDefs,
  resolvers,
  engine: {
    /* Other, existing `engine` configuration should remain the same. */

    generateClientInfo: ({      request    }) => {      const headers = request.http && request.http.headers;      if(headers) {        return {          clientName: headers['apollographql-client-name'],          clientVersion: headers['apollographql-client-version'],        };      } else {        return {          clientName: "Unknown Client",          clientVersion: "Unversioned",        };      }    },
  }
});

server.listen().then(({ url }) => {
  console.log(`🚀  Server ready at ${url}`);
});

Specifying this function overrides the defaultGenerateClientInfo function that Apollo Server calls otherwise.

Logging

Apollo Server provides two ways to log a server: per input, response, and errors or periodically throughout a request's lifecycle. Treating the GraphQL execution as a black box by logging the inputs and outputs of the system allows developers to diagnose issues quickly without being mired by lower level logs. Once a problem has been found at a high level, the lower level logs enable accurate tracing of how a request was handled.

High-level logging

Apollo Server allows formatError and formatResponse configuration options which can be defined as callback-functions which receive error or response arguments respectively.

For the sake of simplicity, these examples use console.log to output error and debugging information though a more complete example might utilize existing logging or error-reporting facilities.

const server = new ApolloServer({
  typeDefs,
  resolvers,
  formatError: error => {
    console.log(error);
    return error;
  },
  formatResponse: response => {
    console.log(response);
    return response;
  },
});

server.listen().then(({ url }) => {
  console.log(`🚀  Server ready at ${url}`);
});

Granular logs

For more advanced cases, Apollo Server provides an experimental API that accepts an array of graphql-extensions to the extensions field. These extensions receive a variety of lifecycle calls for each phase of a GraphQL request and can keep state, such as the request headers.

const { ApolloServer }  = require('apollo-server');
const LoggingExtension = require('./logging');

const server = new ApolloServer({
  typeDefs,
  resolvers,
  extensions: [() => new LoggingExtension()]
});

server.listen().then(({ url }) => {
  console.log(`🚀  Server ready at ${url}`);
});

For example, the logFunction from Apollo Server 1 can be implemented as an extension and could be modified to add additional state or functionality.